Dermatology

Psoriasis

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic disease that develops when a person's immune system sends faulty signals which tell skin cells to grow too quickly. New skin cells form in days rather than weeks. The body does not shed these excess skin cells therefore they pile up on the surface of the skin, causing patches of psoriasis to appear. Psoriasis may look contagious, but it's not. You cannot get psoriasis from touching someone who has it. To get psoriasis, a person must inherit the genes that cause it.

Types of psoriasis
  • Plaque (also called psoriasis vulgaris).
  • Guttate.
  • Inverse (also called flexural psoriasis or intertriginous psoriasis).
  • Pustular.
  • Erythrodermic (also called exfoliative psoriasis).

To diagnose psoriasis, a dermatologist, examines a patient's skin, nails, and scalp for signs of psoriasis, and enquires whether any of the family members had psoriasis. The dermatologist learns about what has been happening in the patient's life. A dermatologist may want to know whether a patient has been under a lot of stress, had a recent illness, or just started taking a medicine. Treatment can reduce signs and symptoms of psoriasis, which usually makes a person, feel better. With treatment, some people see their skin completely clear. Treatment can even improve a person's quality of life.

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